CURRENT NEWS

Ice Shelf Action

 

An update on the circumpolar NECKLACE project

Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The SOOS-endorsed NECKLACE project led by Keith Nicholls of the British Antarctic Survey, uses newly developed technology to collect year-round time-series data on ice-shelf melt. The instrument (developed by the University College London and the British Antarctic Survey), is a lightweight, low power and low cost, ground-based downward-looking radar that measures changes in ice-shelf thickness to millimetre precision. The aim of NECKLACE is to use the circumpolar reach of Antarctic research nations to deploy instruments on all major ice shelves for an extended period during 2015 – 2020.

Four instruments were deployed in 2013/2014 as a proof-of-concept; three on Pine Island Glacier (UK) and one on the Ross Ice Shelf (Coulman High, NZ)(see figure below). These have been recording ice-shelf melt data over the last year and will be collected this coming season.

Building on the success of the initial deployments, activities during the coming two field seasons (2014/2015 and 2015/2016) will greatly enhance the network. In 2014/2015 the UK will re-deploy the three Pine Island Glacier instruments, and install two more on the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, followed by an additional 15 instruments on the Filchner-Ronne in 2015/2016. Australia will deploy two instruments on the Amery Ice Shelf in 2014/2015 and plans to enhance this further, pending funding. Belgium will install one instrument on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf.

Data

The instruments being deployed are connected with individual projects, and the data availability is therefore dependent on the funding bodies involved. Anyone interested in accessing the data should contact individual PI’s :

UK:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Aus: Ben Galton-Fenzi
Belgium: Frank Pattyn
New Zealand: Mike Williams


Call to Action

A key strength of NECKLACE lies in the relatively low cost/effort for high return of both the instrument and the logistics required for deployment. Any nation currently involved in activities near ice shelves can easily deploy instruments and take part in this international initiative.

For more information on how to get involved in NECKLACE, please contact  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

**Survey**: The Judge Business School, Cambridge University, is working with the British Antarctic Society (BAS) to assess the scientific interest in the instrument used in this NECKLACE program. Click here to provide input.

 

Click here for more information on the scientific rationale for the NECKLACE project and a detailed description of the instrument.

Copyright 2015 Southern Ocean Observing System. All rights reserved.